"Red Star Over China" 80 Years Later

Edgar Snow with Mao Tse-tung

"Red Star Over China" 80 Years Later:
Edgar Snow’s “Scoop of the Century” and its Lasting Impact on US-China Relations

Exhibit Opening Tuesday, June 6, 5:30-7:30pm
UMKC Miller Nichols Library

4th Floor, Dean's Gallery

Free and open to the public
RSVP by email or phone

The Diastole Scholars' Center is partnering with the UMKC Libraries for an exhibit exploring Edgar Snow’s life and legacy, and 80 years of US-China Relations.

A Kansas City native, Edgar Snow spent much of the 1930s traveling across China. In 1936, he became the first western journalist to visit the revolutionary army’s stronghold in the western hills of Shaanxi Province. In the town of Baoan and the caves of Yanan, Snow spent five months interviewing Mao Tse-tung and other Chinese Communist leaders, while he observed the Red Army in action and saw how guerrilla forces lived among the people.

Snow's classic account of the revolutionary movement that founded the People’s Republic of China, Red Star Over China, made him world famous. At the time, there was little exchange between the US and China. Snow’s watershed book helped Americans overcome much of the distrust and fear they felt by introducing the men and women of the Chinese Communist Party through the eyes of an American journalist.  His work inspired many other Americans to look at China from the inside and to promote greater mutual understanding.

Now 80 years later, we explore the legacy of Snow's work and the development of trade, diplomacy and cultural exchanges between the US and China.

More information about Edgar Snow's Life and Legacy is available via Labudde Special Collections at UMKC.